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30

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15 WORST STATES FOR RETIREMENT

Number crunching alone can’t tell you where to retire. That’s a choice you’ll ultimately need to make on your own. But identifying the places that hold the lowest appeal for retirees can at least help narrow your search.

We rated all 50 states based on quantifiable factors that are important to many retirees. Our rankings penalized states with high living expenses—especially taxes and health care costs—and rewarded states with relatively prosperous populations of residents age 65 and up. We also ranked states lower if their populations are medically unhealthy, or if the state has fiscal health problems (red ink in state budgets could lead to tax hikes and program spending cuts for seniors).

Using our methodology, the following 15 states rank as the least attractive for retirees. That doesn’t make them terrible places to live. They might, indeed, be great states in which to work or raise a family. You might even choose to stick around in retirement simply to be close to your grandchildren. But in dollars-and-practical-sense terms, retirees might be better off looking to settle elsewhere.

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15. MINNESOTA

Population: 5.4 million

Share of population 65+: 13.6% (U.S.: 14.5%)

Cost of living: 2% above the U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $43,623 (U.S.: $50,291)

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Near average at $387,007 (U.S.: $387,731)

Minnesota’s tax rating for retirees: Least Tax Friendly

The Land of 10,000 Lakes is a hard place for retirees to stay afloat. Above-average living expenses and below-average incomes can equate to imbalanced budgets in retirement. Plus, the tax situation adds an extra burden. One of the 10 Worst States for Taxes on Retirees, Minnesota taxes Social Security benefits the same as the feds. Most other retirement income, including military, government and private pensions, is also taxable. And the state’s sales and income taxes are high.

On the other hand, Minnesota is a great place for health-focused retirees. The state is the third-healthiest in the country for seniors, according to the United Health Foundation rankings, which are based on people’s behaviors, such as physical activity, as well as community support and clinical care provided. In fact, Rochester, home of the renowned Mayo Clinic, ranks seventh among the best small metro areas for successful aging, according to the Milken Institute, in part due to its abundance of health care providers.

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15. MINNESOTA

Population: 5.4 million

Share of population 65+: 13.6% (U.S.: 14.5%)

Cost of living: 2% above the U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $43,623 (U.S.: $50,291)

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Near average at $387,007 (U.S.: $387,731)

Minnesota’s tax rating for retirees: Least Tax Friendly

The Land of 10,000 Lakes is a hard place for retirees to stay afloat. Above-average living expenses and below-average incomes can equate to imbalanced budgets in retirement. Plus, the tax situation adds an extra burden. One of the 10 Worst States for Taxes on Retirees, Minnesota taxes Social Security benefits the same as the feds. Most other retirement income, including military, government and private pensions, is also taxable. And the state’s sales and income taxes are high.

On the other hand, Minnesota is a great place for health-focused retirees. The state is the third-healthiest in the country for seniors, according to the United Health Foundation rankings, which are based on people’s behaviors, such as physical activity, as well as community support and clinical care provided. In fact, Rochester, home of the renowned Mayo Clinic, ranks seventh among the best small metro areas for successful aging, according to the Milken Institute, in part due to its abundance of health care providers.

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